Tag Archives: semiconductor manufacturing technology

We Have Degrees for the 25 Best Jobs of 2015

jobsThe 25 best jobs of 2015, according to U.S. News & World Report, are primarily in two categories: computer technology and health care. Our colleges offer degrees or certificates for 19 of the 25 best jobs.

See our posts about the 2014, 2013 and 2012 best jobs to compare past years.

The 25 Best Jobs (and our college programs that go with them):

  1. Dentist (take the Core Curriculum at our colleges before you go to dental school)
  2. Nurse practitioner (Nursing)
  3. Software developer (Computer Information Technology – credit, Computer Information Technology — noncredit, Internet Development Technologies, Mobile App Developer)
  4. Physician (take the Core Curriculum at our colleges before you go to medical school)
  5. Dental hygienist (Dental Assisting)
  6. Physical therapist (Physical Therapy Aide)
  7. Computer systems analyst (Computer Information Technology – creditComputer Information Technology – noncredit, Digital Forensics)
  8. Information security analyst (Computer Information Technology – creditComputer Information Technology – noncredit, Digital Forensics)
  9. Registered nurse (Nursing)
  10. Physician assistant (Medical Assisting)
  11. Web developer (Computer Information Technology – creditComputer Information Technology — noncredit, Internet Development Technologies)
  12. Diagnostic medical sonographer (Diagnostic Medical Sonography)
  13. Occupational therapist
  14. Market research analyst (Marketing Careers, Business Administration)
  15. Marketing manager (Marketing Careers)
  16. Accountant (Accounting)
  17. School psychologist
  18. Mechanical engineer (Engineering Technology, Mechatronics Technology, Nanotechnology, Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology)
  19. Occupational therapy assistant
  20. Operations research analyst (Logistics Technology – credit, Logistics Technology — noncredit, Mathematics)
  21. IT manager (Computer Information Technology – credit, Computer Information Technology — noncredit)
  22. Civil engineer (Engineering Technology, Geographic Information Systems, Computer Aided Design and Drafting)
  23. Cost estimator (Construction Management, Project Management, Accounting, Business Administration)
  24. Esthetician
  25. Financial advisor (Accounting, Business Administration)

Leave a comment

Filed under Careers, Continuing Education, Credit, Noncredit, Programs, Why DCCCD?

We Have Degrees for the 25 Best Jobs of 2014

photo of a group of college studentsThe 25 best jobs of 2014, according to U.S. News & World Report, are focused primarily in three industries: computer technology, health care and engineering. Our colleges offer degrees or certificates for 19 of the 25 best jobs. (See our posts about the 2013 and 2012 lists to compare past years.)

The 25 Best Jobs (and our college programs that go with them):

  1. Software developer (Computer Information Technology – Programming, Internet Development Technologies)
  2. Computer systems analyst (Computer Information Technology – Programming, Digital Forensics)
  3. Dentist (Dental Assisting)
  4. Nurse practitioner (Nursing, Nursing Assistant and Patient Care Technician)
  5. Pharmacist (Pharmacy Technician)
  6. Registered nurse (Nursing)
  7. Physical therapist
  8. Physician (take the Core Curriculum at our colleges before you go to medical school)
  9. Web developer (Computer Information Technology – Web/Internet Services, Engineering Emphasis Degree in Computer Engineering, Engineering Emphasis Degree in Computer Science, Internet Development Technologies)
  10. Dental hygienist (Dental Assisting)
  11. Information security analyst (Computer Information Technology – Networking/Security, Digital Forensics)
  12. Database administrator (Computer Information Technology – Networking/Security, Computer Information Technology – Programming, Engineering Emphasis Degree in Computer Engineering, Engineering Emphasis Degree in Computer Science)
  13. Physician assistant
  14. Occupational therapist
  15. Market research analyst (Marketing Careers)
  16. Phlebotomist (Medical Laboratory Technician, Nursing, Phlebotomy)
  17. Physical therapy assistant (Physical Therapy Aide)
  18. Civil engineer (Engineering Technology – Computer-Aided Design, Computer Aided Design and Drafting)
  19. Mechanical engineer (Engineering Emphasis Degree in Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronics Technology, Nanotechnology, Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology)
  20. Veterinarian (Veterinary Technology)
  21. Occupational therapy assistant
  22. Clinical laboratory technician (Biotechnology, Medical Laboratory Technician)
  23. Operations research analyst (Engineering Emphasis Degree in Industrial Engineering, Logistics Technology)
  24. IT manager (Computer Information Technology – Programming, Engineering Emphasis Degree in Computer Engineering, Engineering Emphasis Degree in Computer Science)
  25. Dietician and nutritionist

5 Comments

Filed under Careers, Continuing Education, Credit, Programs, Why DCCCD?

Could You Use a Career Boost? Apply to Become a STEM Scholar!

STEM Institute logoAre you planning a career in science, technology, engineering or math? Give yourself a career edge by applying to become a STEM Scholar!

The standards of the DCCCD STEM Institute are high, and the process is competitive, but the opportunities are exceptional.

As a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Scholar, you will:

  • Earn an award ranging from $600 to $1,320 per semester
  • Participate in exclusive events designed to support your education and career
  • Engage with state and local universities
  • Interact and network with top STEM professionals
  • Receive mentoring from dedicated STEM Faculty Fellows

The deadline to submit your application is May 31, 2013.

Download an information packet today. To learn details about eligibility requirements or to find out who to contact for more information, visit the DCCCD Foundation website.

Leave a comment

Filed under Paying for College

Semiconductors Hold Promise as Technical Career

Looking for a highly skilled occupation that holds the possibility of high pay? Check out DCCCD’s Semiconductor Manufacturing program!

Semiconductors, or microchips, are the “brains” of computers and can be found in almost every electronic product — including cars, fax machines, pagers, cell phones, microwaves and traffic signals. The Internet, wireless communications, satellites and modern medicine all depend on the microchips that control sophisticated computer systems.

Career Opportunities

Become the kind of highly skilled technician that the industry needs. Learn how to install, repair and maintain the equipment it takes to make a modern semiconductor chip.

The semiconductor manufacturing technology technician is responsible for product operation, equipment monitoring, equipment adjustment and both routine and emergency repair and maintenance of the many different pieces of equipment it takes to make a modern semiconductor chip.

The semiconductor industry is looking for trained, entry-level technicians. Local industry giant Texas Instruments Inc. has hired many of our program graduates.

Entry-level positions generally require a high school diploma or GED and an associate degree.

Degrees or Certificates

Richland College offers a Semiconductor Manufacturing-Equipment Technician Associate in Applied Sciences degree as well as a Semiconductor Manufacturing – Operator Certificate.

In addition to receiving classroom instruction, students in Semiconductor Manufacturing have the opportunity to participate in cooperative education to gain first-hand knowledge and experience in the semiconductor industry.

How to Get Started

To get started in Semiconductor Manufacturing, complete the admissions process at Richland College. When you meet with an academic advisor, mention your interest in Semiconductor Manufacturing so he or she can help you determine which courses you should take.

Contact Us

If you have questions about the Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology program that aren’t answered on our website, please feel free to contact us. Kory J. Goldammer is coordinator of the Semiconductor Manufacturing program at Richland College.

Leave a comment

Filed under Careers, Credit, Noncredit, Programs

Student Success Story: Stacy Williams

Can earning an associate degree in semiconductor manufacturing help your career? Ask Stacy Williams.

“When I started working at Texas Instruments as a manufacturing operator, I already had a bachelor’s degree in business administration,” she says. “Right from the start, I was fascinated with integrated circuits and the process of building them. Then I found out about the Semiconductor Manufacturing program at Richland College and registered to start classes there. This program helped further my career at TI by teaching me everything I needed to know about the semiconductor manufacturing process.”

Stacy is now a process engineer at TI, where she assists in processing engineering test requests, troubleshoots statistical process control chart failures and supports the manufacturing process in other ways.

“Once I received my associate degree, I moved out of the manufacturing department and got a job in the engineering department as a process engineering technician, where I support the manufacturing process and help the engineers in developing new processes.

“My DCCCD education allowed me to move up from an entry-level position and to plan and accomplish career goals.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Careers, Credit, Noncredit, Programs, Student Success Story

Deadline Extended to April 1 for $1,000 Science, Math Stipends

Do you plan to study science, technology, engineering or math? Then be sure to apply for a $1,000 student support award offered by the DCCCD Development Office.

The application deadline, originally March 1, has been extended to April 1.

One hundred STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Initiative Student Support Awards will be made. And if you’re chosen, you’ll get other benefits, too.

As an award recipient, you’ll receive:

  • a $1,000 student support stipend awarded in two installments of $500 (for Fall 2011 and Spring 2012)
  • mentoring
  • information about transfer opportunities
  • opportunities to explore careers and network with other STEM students, faculty and industry professionals, and participate in a summit where you’ll learn about issues and opportunities in STEM areas

Eligibility requirements include:

  • career interests in the STEM professions and/or teaching in STEM disciplines
  • GPA of 3.0 or higher
  • enroll in a minimum of six credit hours each semester

Get complete details, including a list of eligible and ineligible programs, an application and more on the DCCCD Foundation website.

Leave a comment

Filed under Paying for College