A Day in the Life of an Online College Student: Elissa

ElissaColich2written by Elissa Colich, a fall student blogger

You can wind your clock to my daily routine. You can likely know where I will be on any given day (Monday through Friday) after following me for 24 hours. Sounds boring, I know. Trust me, not a day goes by that I don’t sit and daydream about my days of hanging in a comfy coffee house chair and getting lost in a good book, or even literally getting lost in the woods.

Life moves quickly, just as every student knows well. Before you know it, you are already having to sign up for next semester’s classes and you feel like you just got the hang of the ones you are in.

During those 24 hours, you can find me at my job (Starbucks), both working and studying. I have worked for the same company for 13 years, and it has taught me many things about being successful in school that school never could.

1. Know your stuff

Customers don’t care whether you are new, having a bad day or were trained the wrong way. They want their drinks or food quickly, with a smile and perfect…every single time. You have to be prepared at all times, armed with knowledge and a positive attitude. And when those fail, we fake it until we make it!

Every night before I relax for a little pre-bed TV time, I gather all of the school stuff I will need for the next day as well as make a list of the order I want to (attempt) to accomplish it in. I will also flip through my most pressing assignment before bed because they say that if you sleep after studying, you retain the information better.

2. Have a routine

I wake up every morning at 4 a.m. No dilly-dallying or snooze buttons. I may walk a little slower out of the bedroom on certain days, but time waits for no barista.

Once I get to work around 5 a.m., I get started on my opening routine. If there are any former or current baristas out there, you will know what I mean. We have the exact same routine every day, whether it is opening or closing the store, doing dishes or even making a latte. If you do it the same way every time, your body begins to do it without you.

3. Pick your poison

I have to force myself to choose a priority. My job pays the bills, but great grades pay for school. I use my two breaks (40 minutes total) to study. I have to be careful not to let the Internet distract me, so I try to only take the schoolwork where I won’t need the Internet.

4. Stick with the routine

I work eight hours every day and can be very tired and grumpy at the end, but it’s not the end of my day by any means. I have to force myself to stay at the store and finish at least one task on my list before I get to go home and eat lunch. Oh yeah, I don’t eat meals at work because it makes me tired.

Around 2-ish, I head home (luckily only a five-minute drive), feed the (wild) birds and squirrels (we have two named Amy and Gravy Boat), and set up my “station” with whatever project I need to work on.

After I eat a quick bite, I will spend the next four hours studying. If my deadlines are super close, no television on in the background.

5. Breathe deep

Aside from the set routine, the most important thing work has taught me about school is to take deep breaths. One of my favorite sayings in the coffee business when I find myself or my peers getting a little too upset over the small stuff is “it’s just beans and water.”

In the grand scheme of things, life isn’t just short, it’s tough. It can be downright cruel and punishable. I do my best to always take as much time to breath and relax as possible.

I stop working when my boyfriend gets home. That is our time to shut it all off and laugh to some good sitcoms or scream at some bad football.

On the weekends I rarely do schoolwork. That is when I take road trips or find a way to enjoy nature.

My hopes are that my currently “boring” days bring enriching and fun-filled days in the future.

***Read all of our student blogger posts. Are you interested in being a student blogger? Send us an email at socialteam@dcccd.edu.

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Take That, Van Gogh! We Appreciate Our Artists

Reagan Chandler with her work, Depression.

Reagan Chandler, with “Depression”

The work of student artists at our colleges doesn’t go unappreciated.  Nineteen artists (18 students and one faculty member) whose work is displayed at the headquarters of DCCCD were honored Nov. 10 at a special reception.

The artists’ work is displayed in the new Rotating Art Exhibit in the Founders’ Foyer of DCCCD’s headquarters. The exhibit changes each year, bringing in new student art to the Foyer.

The students and faculty member whose artwork was selected for the current exhibit are:

  • Allison Arnold, Karla Garcia and Ted Houston, Brookhaven College;
  • Heather Bennett, Glenda Curtis, Marianna Eubank and Jessica Battes-Grabowski (adjunct instructor), Mountain View College;
  • Wryn Best, Hilda Gutierrez, Carla Morlock and David Seifert, Cedar Valley College;
  • Reagan Chandler, Richland College;
  • Kristin Corr, Richard Martin, Glen Smith and Amy Suttle, North Lake College;
  • David Lackey, Eastfield College;
  • Isiah McGrew and Brenda Soto, El Centro College.

The exhibit’s 21 pieces range from oil or acrylic paintings to stoneware or ceramic sculptures. The Founders Foyer and art exhibit are made possible by a gift from Margaret McDermott.

The Post-Impressionist painter Vincent Van Gogh, perhaps best known for his work “The Starry Night,” was unappreciated during his lifetime. We’re not comparing our artists’ work to Van Gogh’s. On the other hand, you decide: Visit the Founders’ Foyer at the DCCCD District Office.

Fall 2014 Foyer exhibit artists785

DCCCD Foundation arts committee chair Lyn McBee (left) and Foundation board member Gay Solomon (right) with the artists.

 

 

 

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Here’s Who Won an iPod by Taking Our Survey

Donisher Reed won an iPodCongratulations to Donisher Reed! She is the winner of an iPod Nano. Her winning entry was drawn at random from among those of you who completed the Student Communications Preferences Survey in October.

Donisher is an Eastfield College online student. She plans to get an associate degree in Child Development.

“I would like to thank Ms. Georgeann Elliott Moss, director of Internet Publishing, for the efforts taken to contact me about winning the contest … . Hopefully I didn’t scream too loud in her ear upon receiving news of my winning,” Donisher said.

Who’s Your Fave: Facebook or Instagram?

Dallas County Community College District conducted the online Student Communications Preferences Survey to find out how you use the Internet and your cellphone, and how you want to get information, whether through social media such as Facebook or Twitter, mobile apps or other ways.

You might be surprised by some of the survey findings:

  • A full 85 percent of you reported being logged on to Instagram at least once each day. That’s slightly below Facebook’s 88 percent. And 70 percent reported being on Twitter at least once a day.
  • More of you are downloading the DCCCD Mobile App, available from Google Play for Android phones or Apple for the iPhone. Thirty-seven percent of you reported knowing about the app. And most of those who used the app found it very useful.

See full results from the DCCCD Student Communications Preferences Survey. And thanks for participating.

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Don’t Wait! Spring, Winter Registration Has Started

Reg79_NewsOfNote200x160Priority registration for the Spring 2015 and Winter terms began Tuesday, Nov. 18.

Take advantage of priority registration to sign up for classes before registration is open to the general public. Remember, the sooner you register, the better your chances of getting the classes you want.

Priority registration ends Sunday, Nov. 23. Regular registration, which is open to everyone, begins Monday, Nov. 24.

Registration for Spring 2015 classes ends Jan. 14. The end date to register for Winter term classes varies by class.

Spring credit classes begin Tuesday, Jan. 20.

We also offer Spring Flex Term classes that don’t follow the regular semester schedules.

Consider Winter Term Classes

The Winter minimester lets you earn three or more credit hours in just a few weeks. The schedule of classes is different at each college. However, Winter Term classes typically last from mid-December through early January. Course offerings vary by college, also. Check out our Winter term class schedule.

Winter minimester classes are intense and fast-paced, so make sure you have the time before you register for them.

How to Register

You can register online (if you are eligible) or register on campus.

Note that dates and times for on-campus registration may vary by college; visit your college’s website for the most current information.

Our offices will be closed Dec. 25 through Jan. 1, but eligible students still can register online.

Have Questions About Registering?

Learn more about registration at DCCCD.

If you still have questions, contact your college’s Admissions/Registrar’s Office. We’ll be glad to help.

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Bookstores Offer 25 Percent Off Tuesday and Wednesday

SaleFacebookTimelinePost150x15-The bookstore at each of the colleges of DCCCD is holding a 25 percent off sale Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 18 and 19.

Get 25 percent off clothing, diploma frames, backpacks, bargain books, earbuds and much more. Most items are available online as well as in-store.

Find your college bookstore’s location.

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Richland Men’s and Women’s Soccer Teams Battle Way Into Finals, But…

newspaper iconThe Richland College men’s and women’s soccer teams made it all the way to the national championship finals over the weekend. However, both lost in the championship game by one goal.

The men’s team lost 2-1 to Suffolk County (New York) in the National Junior College Athletic Association Division III championship. The Thunderducks beat Bunker Hill (Massachusetts) in the first round and Cayuga (New York) in the second round to make it to the finals. The 22-2-1 Thunderducks ended the season with a .920 winning percentage. Read more about the championship game.

The women’s team battled Brookdale Community College to a standstill in regulation. However, Brookdale won in overtime 1-0. The women had defeated Ocean City and Herkimer County community colleges to make it to the finals. Read an account of the championship game.

Congratulations to both teams for their outstanding season.

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8 Top Mobile Apps for College Students

appblogThere’s an app for nearly everything, including lots of apps for things you need to do as a college student — like study, budget, take notes and lots more.

We’ve found these the most helpful for getting organized and making your life easier, but we want to hear from you, too. Tell us about your favorite apps in the comments.

Here are our top eight apps for college students:

  1. Evernote. Evernote is available on your phone, tablet and computer, so you can write, edit and read your notes anywhere. It lets you organize your notes into folders and search your notes for specific keywords. You can also upload pictures, so if you take notes the traditional pen-and-paper way one day, you can still take a picture of your notes and file your paper notes with your digital notes.
  2. Wunderlist/2 Do. These are two of the most powerful list-building apps out there. You can add items to and remove items from to-do lists on your phone, tablet or computer and organize items by type or subject. These apps will help you get and stay organized.
  3. DCCCD. We can’t build a list of the top apps without including our freshly updated DCCCD app. Get instant access to eCampus, eConnect, campus maps, courses, emergency contact info and lots more.
  4. Mint. Mint helps you get a handle on your finances, create a budget and stick to it.
  5. Pandora/Spotify. Fun, free options for listening to music between classes.
  6. Google Drive. Store your assignments on Google Drive and access them from any smartphone, tablet or computer. You can edit your documents anywhere and they’ll update everywhere. So, if you need to print an assignment at school, just drop it into Google Drive on your home computer, then access Google Drive from the browser on a college computer and print the assignment there.
  7. iHomework. iHomework lets you quickly and easily enter homework assignments, create task lists, see your class schedule and keep track of grades.
  8. Studious. A list manager and calendar app built specifically for students, Studious keeps you on track and on schedule.

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Filed under Studying, Why DCCCD?